Data Security Tips Straight from the Experts

Media sources have reported on numerous cases of data breaches lately. With so many cases reported one can’t afford to let their guard down.  Cybersecurity must be a top priority. Safety of data should be a concern of everyone living in our digital world. Not only is the data that we share online exposed to malicious attacks, the data we store on our devices are also prone to theft. We live in a world where we are constantly sharing our personal information. Whether that is doing online banking, shopping online, or just sending emails, we share our information with everyone.  Everywhere we turn our digital information is being watched for weakness so it can be attacked. These attacks are a targeted way of entering our operating systems. Since our data is everywhere, you need to be careful and protect yourself so your digital information isn’t lost, stolen or destroyed. Taking preliminary cautions to protecting your data for some can sound extremely daunting, especially for those who possess no significant technical knowledge. Here are some tips straight from the experts of computer repair services that you must follow to avoid potential data loss.

1) Password Is Your Key

A password is your first line of defense in protecting your data. A strong password is needed to safeguard crucial information on the internet as well as your computer. While shopping online, a strong password will help you protect your digital payments. These payments contain sensitive information that is being sent across the web about your account. Since people tend to use the same password for numerous accounts, the chance of that password being hacked increases. Keep passwords updated and use different passwords for every account. Use random words and characters, instead of passwords that contain personal names and dates. Be sure at … Read the rest

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All About Managed and Unmanaged Dedicated Servers

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When you plan to build a website, the most essential thing to decide is which web hosting server can meet your criteria. A dedicated server is a powerful system that is used to host large business blogs and websites. In dedicated server hosting a whole server is reserved for a single website or account. It offers flexibility, a more reliable and stable hosting environment. These days there are many web hosting companies that are offering dedicated server hosting but not all of them are reliable.

Best Dedicated Server

A dedicated server is the most expensive hosting server but it has become a need of the business website. A business website holds great importance especially when it is an online business website. For an online business, your website remains to be live 24/7 to get a great return on investment (ROI). Dedicated web hosting ensures you maximum server uptime and quick response time to provide you best website performance. Dedicated hosting servers are available in both Windows and Linux OS so that you can select an OS of your own choice.

There are two types of dedicated server hosting but most of the people are unaware of them. These are managed and unmanaged dedicated servers.

Managed Dedicated Server

In managed hosting, the whole server is managed by your hosting provider. All the applications required by the user are installed by your host. They configure your server according to your requirements and keep your OS and other application up to date. Besides this, they perform regular back-up to secure your data and you can recover it quickly in case of any problem. In managed dedicated hosting you have to pay for all the services and it is highly recommended for a newbie who doesn’t know about server management.

Unmanaged Dedicated Server

In … Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Continue reading

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Continue reading

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest Continue reading